A message from the NOAH Dental Team

What to expect at your dental visit during this pandemic.

NOAH Dental Teeth Whitening Education by Marianne Youssef, Dentist

We all want to have white teeth, but how do we achieve that bright healthy smile? Our expert dentist, Dr. Marianne Youssef explains what causes staining and offers a few tips on how to achieve those pearly whites!

Hydration Tips by our Nutrition Experts

July is Hydration Awareness Month

As we continue into the summer months, there are many ways to keep ourselves healthy, and that includes staying hydrated! Below is some information provided by the NOAH Dietitians on the reasons for hydration, how much to drink, and the many ways to hydrate. And remember – Every sip counts!

Why is water important?

  • Keeps body temperatures normal.
  • Improve brain function and mood.
  • Prevents constipation.
  • Gets rid of waste from the body in urine, sweat, and the digestive track.
  • Lubricates joints and protects your spinal cord and other tissues.

How much should you drink?

That’s not as simple of a question as it sounds. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine determined that an adequate daily fluid intake is 15.5 cups (124 oz.) for men and 11.5 cups (92 oz.) a day for women. All beverages (even coffee and tea) count as fluids, and plenty of foods are good sources of fluids, like fruits, vegetables, and soups. The common wisdom of 8 cups of water a day (64 oz.) is great place to start!

When do you need more water?

In general, you need more water when you lose more water by sweating or your digestive track.

  • In hot Arizona summers.
  • More physically active.
  • Running a fever.
  • Having diarrhea or vomiting.

How can you tell if you’re not drinking enough?

You may have one or more of the signs below if you need more water.

  • Thirst.
  • Darker than light yellow urine.
  • Dizziness or headaches.
  • Muscle cramps or fatigue.

Tips for getting enough water?

  • Carry a water bottle. Try freezing one overnight for ice-cold water all day.
  • For a little extra flavor, add something! Lemon, lime, mango, mint, cucumber, strawberry, melon, jalapeno or a low/no calorie flavorings can enhance the taste of water.
  • Have a glass of water with meals and before, after, and during exercise.
  • Still having trouble remembering – try an app. Apps like Water Coach and WaterMinder will help you set goals and send you reminders to keep you on track.
  • Snack on watermelon, cucumbers, other water-rich fruits and vegetables or reduced-fat yogurt. You’ll benefit from the extra fluid and healthy nutrients.
  • Use a large water container such as 1 gallon (128 oz.) and mark off times to indicate how low the water level should be at different points in the day such as 12pm, 4pm, and 8pm.
  • Place water bottles or cups in different areas of the home or office where you spend a lot of time, such as the chair you usually read in. These can serve as a physical reminder to drink more.

National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month by Cody Randall, PA-C Psychiatric Services

Disparities in access to healthcare exist across all specialties. This proves to be especially true when it comes to mental healthcare, and even more so among minority populations.

A number of barriers exist for patients seeking mental health services including healthcare worker shortage, disparity of access to appropriate medical insurance coverage, stigma of receiving mental healthcare and the fragmented relationship of medical and mental health services. Healthcare providers/organizations can take practical steps to improve patient access by:

  • Making mental health screenings a staple component of primary medical care.
  • Recognizing the social/cultural aspects of a patient population that may impact a patient’s medical and mental health.
  • Medical organizations can conduct community health needs assessments (CHNA) in their patient communities to identify specific needs and limitations among the minority populations that they serve. In identifying these needs of their communities organizations and individual medical providers can help to ensure that patients of minority populations receive quality and affordable mental health services.
  • Working towards a more collaborative approach between medical and mental health practices/providers to reduce barriers to care.

A patient’s care is often more than just medication. The greatest care cannot help unless a patient has support/resources in place to provide them with access to this care and fundamental life necessities. 

For more information on National Mental Health Awareness Month as well as information on general mental health visit the Nation Awareness on Mental Illness (NAMI) at https://www.nami.org/home.