Is Nutrition Really that Important to my Health?

Yes. Yes, it is!

Nutrition is the foundation on which overall health and wellness is built. People fight diseases, prevent health problems, feel better overall, and live healthier lives with good nutrition. This is why NOAH is committed to the key role our Nutrition Services team plays in our integrated care.

Why nutrition matters

When your body gets the minerals and vitamins it needs, everything works better, especially when those nutrients come from what you eat and drink.

Many people think the main benefit of eating healthier is losing weight. And that can be a wonderful benefit because losing weight can impact someone’s overall health. However, the real benefits are:

  • Reduced high blood pressure
  • Reduced high cholesterol
  • Improved energy level
  • Improved ability to recover from injury or illnesses
  • Better able to fight off illnesses
  • Reduced risk of diseases like heart disease, stroke, certain cancers, diabetes, and more.

During this National Nutrition Month, NOAH’s Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDN) have shared their expert insights about:

Why? Because they see every day how improving nutrition can improve someone’s life.

How nutrition fits into healthcare

At NOAH, we provide comprehensive, integrated care which means all of our departments and providers work together. And nutrition can greatly impact so many patients at any stage of life.

Some examples:

  • Medical providers might be concerned about a patient’s blood pressure. Nutrition will be one of the ways to make improvements. But many people think they have to change their diet and lifestyle overnight to reach their goals. That isn’t the case. A NOAH RDN will learn about the patient, meet with them, and create a plan together. Maybe nutrition alone can help, or maybe it’s a combination of diet and medication. Regardless, it’s always an important step to take.
  • If a patient has reactions when they eat certain foods like dairy or the gluten often found in many breads, pastas, and cereals, an RDN can help. A patient may be lactose intolerant, or it can depend on how much dairy they have. Similarly, maybe a patient has tested positive for gluten intolerance or celiac disease. These individuals will benefit by adding a RDN to their medical team. There are many delicious options available, and ways to prepare food with different ingredients so patients enjoy what they love and are doing what is best for their health.

Do you have questions for our RDNs? Talk to your healthcare provider at your next appointment and get to know how our Nutrition Services team can help you.

Alcohol Facts

Drug & Alcohol Facts Week

By Brandon Bolton, RDN |Nutrition Educator

This week is Drug and Alcohol Facts Week; a time to share facts and awareness about drugs and alcohol with our communities. This article will take a closer look at the truth about alcohol.

According to the 2019 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 86% of people 18 and older said they drank alcohol at some point in their lifetime, 69.5% reported that they drank in the past year, and 55% reported that they drank in the past month.

What is binge drinking?

What is more serious, is that this survey also showed that 26% of people 18 and older reported that they engaged in binge drinking in the past month. Binge drinking is a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol level to 0.08%, also usually looks like 5+ drinks for men, 4+ drinks for women at one setting (night out, at a party, etc.) in about a 2-hour timeframe.

What is heavy drinking?

Heavy drinking is considered 15+ drinks for men, 8+ drinks for women each week. The difference between binge drinking and heavy drinking is that binge drinking is a large amount in a very short time. Heavy drinking is a higher than healthy amount on a regular basis.

Bottom line

Drinking too much alcohol can lead to poor overall health. People who drink too much alcohol are also be more likely to eat poorly. Alcohol can also affect digestion and how your body absorbs nutrients. Too much alcohol can lead to deficiencies in important vitamins like B-complex and many more.

My advice

Talk to your doctor or medical provider to see if it is safe for you to drink alcohol. If you do choose to have alcohol, drink in moderation. Drinking less is better for overall health than heavy drinking or binge drinking. The CDC describes safe, moderate alcohol consumption for most adults as 2 drinks or less for men, and 1 drink or less for women per day.

But make sure you understand what is considered 1 drink.

  • 12 ounces of beer (5% alcohol content)
  • 8 ounces of malt liquor (7% alcohol content)
  • 5 ounces of wine (12% alcohol content)
  • 1.5 ounces or a “shot” of 80-proof (40% alcohol content) distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, whiskey)

Following these guidelines will support good nutrition, and that plays an important role in your health. Following nutrition guidelines and eating a balanced diet can help ensure our bodies are getting all the nutrients to keep us feeling healthy both physically and emotionally.

Good nutrition means:

  • Eat a wide variety of foods.
  • Make half your plate fruits and vegetables.
  • Half of your grains coming from whole grains like 100% whole wheat bread, oatmeal, brown rice, and quinoa.
  • Vary your protein and eat protein rich foods like:
    • Lean meats: 95% lean ground beef, pork tenderloin, skinless chicken or turkey (limit red meats to one time per week)
    • Fish such as salmon and tuna at least once per week
    • Eggs
    • Nuts, seeds, tofu, tempeh, edamame
    • Legumes such as beans, lentils, and chickpeas
  • Switch to low fat or fat-free dairy milk or yogurt.
  • Limit sugar-sweetened beverages.
  • Aim for 30 minutes of moderate physical activity 5 days per week.

Living a healthy life means considering the many ways we can improve and maintain our health. Alcohol can be safely consumed for most adults, but moderation is important. Reducing or eliminating alcohol from your diet is a great way to improve your overall health. To learn more, call NOAH at 480-882-4545, or fill out this form to meet with one of our Registered Dietitian Nutritionists.

Exercise Options: Alternatives to the Gym

By By Nicole Vaudrin O’Reilly, MS, RD |Nutrition Educator

Physical activity is an important part of health and wellness. Not everyone can go to a gym, especially during the pandemic. Thankfully, there are many other exercise options. Always check with your healthcare provider before starting a new exercise program, especially if you have any physical or health limitations. Remember to follow COVID precautions, like wearing a mask and washing your hands, in public places.

Recommendations

  • For adults: at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity (ex. brisk walking, riding a bike, and mowing the lawn). Preferably, also with 2 days a week of muscle strengthening exercises (ex. Lifting weights, using resistance bands, and some forms of yoga).
  • For children ages 6 to 17 years old: at least 60 minutes (1 hour) or more of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity most days and at least 3 days a week of muscle strengthening exercises.
  • For more information, please check out CDC guidelines.

Outdoor exercise options

  • Walk or jog around your neighborhood
  • Hike at a local trail
  • Play basketball, frisbee, tennis, etc. in your own yard or a park
  • Jump rope in your garage or outside
  • Take a bike ride
  • Do gardening and yard work

Home options

Join a team or take a group class

  • There are less options during the pandemic, but joining a team or taking group classes is a fun and social choice. Many places are offering virtual options.
  • PHXPlays is the largest organization in the valley that provides classes and team sports for youth and adults. Check them out here.
  • Your local gym may have classes, or you can go to a specialized studio for things like martial arts, spin, barre, yoga, etc.

Physical activity is one very important piece to overall health and wellness. Learn more about the many services our nutrition team can offer in NOAH’s individualized, comprehensive healthcare.

Getting Started with Meal Planning and Meal Preparation

By Mina Goodman, Registered Dietitian

If you’ve been wanting to follow a healthier diet or eat less, change is possible! According to National Institutes of Health behavior change expert Dr. Susan Czajkowski, there are decades worth of research showing that certain strategies can make changing habits easier. Here, I will walk you through some tips for meal planning and prepping that I like.

Back to the basics

If you haven’t heard of MyPlate before, it’s a simple way to get started with meal planning. The idea is ideally half your plate at meals and snacks is full of fruits and vegetables, with the other half split between protein (ideally lean protein, meaning lower in fat) and carbohydrates or starches (ideally high in fiber meaning starchy vegetables, whole grains, or more fruit). This can also help guide recipe choices, shopping lists, and help you assess your pantry and refrigerator to ensure that half your ingredients are fruits and vegetables!

Keep track

Whether it’s pen and paper, computer documents, phone notes, or an app, try to keep a running list of snacks, recipes, or meal combinations that you and your family enjoy. The idea is that you can create a cycle of recipes or items for your grocery list that you can come back to each week instead of starting from scratch every time.

Create a system

The best system is the one that works for you, but here are some ideas to start with. There are many ways to plan your meals and snacks like searching online for pre-made meal plans from reputable sources such as the American Heart Association, American Diabetes Association, or a local government or educational site ending with .org, .gov, or .edu. You can also search meal planning and prep strategies on video browsers such as YouTube.

  1. Make a list. Compile a list of recipes from cookbooks, websites, or write down the names of the one you know by heart. You can search for key words such as heart healthy, vegetarian, low carb, or low fat.
  2. Pick your recipes. Decide how many recipes you want to cook each week or each month, then set aside a realistic amount of time. You may want to start with 1 recipe per week and double the recipe, so you have a few leftover meals. Or if you’re already cooking, try set aside extra time to make a few extra meals. It will all depend on your schedule and preferences.
  3. Grocery shopping. Make a grocery list, either pen and paper or digital. I like to use the app Google Keep since it is free, and you can access on desktop or mobile. On an app like this, I can create the list, share it with others and have others able to edit the list in real time, and what I like best is that you can copy and paste ingredients from a website directly into a check list, making the whole process fast and easy.
  4. Give yourself feedback. I recently started doing this and it has been a helpful reminder on how the week went. I keep an excel spread sheet (again this can be done anyway you find easy) where I record the recipes that I prepared each week and then a notes section with what went well and what was challenging. For example, if I am trying to cook multiple recipes on Sunday to avoid cooking during the week, I might realize that I don’t have enough oven space, stove top space, or baking dishes to get it all done. Or I might notice that the recipe made too much or not enough. These notes can help prevent me from making the same mistakes again.

Wherever you choose to start know that there is no right way to meal plan or prep. Getting started is always the right move! If you are interested, learn more about our Nutrition Services or make an appointment today.

Enjoy Snacking Even More During Snack Food Month

By Stephanie Olzinski, MS, RDN |Nutrition Supervisor

Nutrition comes in all forms, colors, and quality. Most of the time we think of snack food as something less healthy and make our major meals the place to get all those good nutrients we need like proteins, healthy fats, and fruits and vegetables. But snacks have a place in healthy lifestyle, especially during National Snack Food Month!

Here are some benefits of snacking and recommendations for fun and satisfying snacks.

Benefits of snacking

  1. Satisfying hunger: Being hungry between meals is not a bad thing! If you body is signaling hunger it usually means it is time to eat. But listen to your body. If you started eating at night because it’s a habit, or turn to a snack during a stressful day, your body might be looking for another form of self-care.
  2. Controlling blood sugars: Diabetes or not, it is important to maintain your blood sugars throughout the day. If we go too long between meals without eating, we risk having our blood sugars drop which can cause shakiness, sweating, lightheadedness, and anxiety. Leave no more than 3-4 hours between eating is recommended.
  3. Meeting calorie and nutrient needs: While calories do not need to be counted every day for most people, remember that all of our organs and body systems need enough calories every day to function properly. We can help by eating enough throughout the day and including good portions of each food group at our meals. Snacks supplement our needs between meals like an extra serving of a fruit, vegetable, or something from the list below.

The best snack choices

Whatever you like! It is best to make pairings just how we do for meals – if we just eat something like chips or celery on its own it won’t keep us full for long. Instead choose a base of a protein or healthy fat which will make the snack more filling. Here are some great examples:

  • String Cheese
  • Turkey Jerky
  • Trail Mix or any type of nut or seed
  • Hummus + Veggies
  • Avocado Toast
  • Hard Boiled Egg
  • Natural Peanut Butter + Celery Stalks + Raisins
  • Cottage Cheese + Veggies or Fruit
  • Edamame
  • Greek Yogurt + Fruit or Peanut Butter
  • Greek Yogurt Dip (plain yogurt with garlic powder, dill, chives, and paprika)
  • Brown Rice Cake + Almond, Peanut, or Sunflower Butter
  • Smoothie (protein base of yogurt, soy milk, protein powder, then add any fruit or vegetable)
banana and peanut butter snacks

Try some the NOAH Nutrition Services team’s favorite snacks:

Banana and Peanut Butter Bites – this snack is quick, easy, and full of protein and potassium (among other nutrients) to help you feel full.

Spicy Roasted Pumpkin Seeds – this flavorful snack is filling and gives a great kick to keep you satisfied for a while.

Oatmeal Energy Bites – these little bites pack a punch of flavor and energy to start your day or get you through a busy afternoon.

Visit our NOAH recipe page for more snack and meal ideas!

Nutrition Impacts Your Heart Health

By Brandon Bolton, RDN |Nutrition Educator

February is American Heart Month, so let’s raise awareness and support for heart health in the fight against heart disease!

According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one killer in the United States, and it is the leading cause of death worldwide. There are many risk factors that impact your chances of having heart disease. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) states that preventing heart disease starts with knowing what your risk factors are and what you can do to lower them.

Some risk factors for heart disease include:

  • high blood pressure
  • high blood cholesterol
  • obesity
  • diabetes
  • smoking
  • lack of physical activity
  • unhealthy eating behaviors

These risk factors can be managed or changed. Some risk factors that cannot be changed include age, sex, and family history of heart disease.

If you have any questions or concerns about potential risk factors, please check with your NOAH healthcare provider!

As a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist, I provide nutritional care and guidance for patients with nutrition-related conditions like diabetes and pre-diabetes, cardiovascular disease, weight management, digestive issues, food allergies, and more.

Advice to living a heart-healthy life

Heart disease is often preventable when people make healthy changes, including diet and how much activity or exercise they get. Living a heart-healthy life means knowing your risk factors and making good choices to protect your heart and stay healthy. Here are some heart-healthy nutrition and exercise tips:

  • Choose heart-healthy foods and eat a diet that is balanced with whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and lean protein sources.
    • Try to have at least half of your grain intake come from whole grains such as 100% whole wheat bread, oatmeal, brown rice, and quinoa.
    • Aim for 1-2 cups of fruit daily
    • Aim for 1-3 cups of vegetables daily
  • Choose fat-free or low-fat dairy products when having milk, cheese, or yogurt.

Foods to enjoy

  • Lean meats such as 95% lean ground beef or pork tenderloin, or skinless chicken or turkey (limit red meats to one time per week)
    • Fish such as salmon and tuna (try to eat fish as least once per week)
    • Eggs
    • Nuts, seeds, tofu, tempeh, edamame
    • Legumes such as beans, lentils, and chickpeas
  • Incorporate foods that are high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (good fats):
    • Olive oil or avocado oil
    • Fish and seafood
    • Nuts and seeds
    • Nut and seed butters
    • Avocados

Foods to limit

  • Limit high sodium foods. Adults and children 14+ should eat less than 2,300 mg of sodium daily.
    • Read food labels and choose foods that are lower in sodium. Look for low sodium, reduced sodium, or no salt added on the food label.
    • Choose fresh, whole foods whenever possible and try to avoid processed foods such as frozen meals.
    • Avoid the saltshaker and flavor foods with herbs and spices instead.
  • Limit saturated fats.
    • Saturated fat is usually found in animal-based proteins such as fatty beef, pork, and chicken skin.
    • It is also found in full-fat dairy products such as whole milk.
    • Butter, lard, coconut and palm oils also contain saturated fats (replace with olive oil).
  • Avoid trans fats.
    • Trans fats can be found in margarine, shortening, processed sweets, baked goods, and some fried foods.
    • Avoid foods with “partially hydrogenated oil” on the ingredient list such as cookies, pastries, baked goods, biscuits, crackers, and frozen dinners.
  • Limit foods that are high in added sugars
    • Sugar-sweetened drinks such as soda, fruit juice, sweetened coffees, and energy drinks
    • Sweets and desserts
  • Limit Alcohol

If you have any nutrition questions or need help developing a heart healthy diet plan, please reach out to one of the dietitians here at NOAH and make an appointment today!

It’s About More Than Just Food

By MaKayla Kellor, Case Manager

When you hear the phrase “eating disorders,” your mind immediately thinks about food, but what most people do not know is that eating disorders are so much more than just food. This year, during National Eating Disorder Awareness week, we hope to shed light on the deadliest mental illness, because though eating disorders are characterized by obsession with food, body weight and size, the root of an eating disorder is so much deeper.

What is an eating disorder?

  • A way to feel in control when everything else in your life feels out of control.
  • Numbing your undesirable feelings with lack of nutrition.
  • An attempt to achieve higher self-esteem and perfectionism through body image.

The most common eating disorders are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge-eating disorder. Though they all have their own signs and symptoms, they all have an equally negative impact on someone’s health, emotions, and ability to function in day-to-day life.

People with eating disorders usually do not think they have a problem. Here are some signs and symptoms to look for if you think someone in your life may have an eating disorder:

  • Skipping meals
  • Making excuses for not eating
  • Intense dieting
  • Excessively working out
  • Avoiding social activities involving food
  • Eating alone rather than with others
  • Lots of talk about body image or weight
  • Using dietary supplements or laxatives
  • Using the restroom immediately after mealtime
  • Eating much more food than a normal portion
  • Shame or guilt around eating

If you are worried that you, or someone you love, has an eating disorder, the best thing you can do to support them is show them love. Eating disorders, like any addiction, are not easy to let go of. You may feel frustration in the process with your loved one and notice that they are not always honest about their progress in recovering from their eating disorder.

Individuals recovering from an eating disorder need compassion and accountability. It may seem as simple as “just eating,” but the depth of an eating disorder and the control, safety, and comfort it provides individuals is much deeper. The unhealthy coping mechanism is still a coping mechanism that has gotten them through their pain, and it will require a lot of inner work. The goal is to get to the root issue that is being masked with disordered eating patterns. People suffering with an eating disorder can’t get better for someone else, so the best thing you can do is show patience and continuous support.

If you have questions about getting help for you or a loved one through an eating disorder, NOAH’s team can help. Call to schedule an appointment with one of our experienced providers.

Get Well with Food: How nutrition helps you recover

By Stephanie Olzinski, MS, RDN & Nicole Vaudrin O’Reilly, RDN

Proper nutrition helps the body fight infections and heal from surgery or wounds, colds, the flu, COVID-19, and other illnesses and injuries. When your body is going through the healing process, it generally increases the need for calories and specific nutrients. When an illness, like COVID-19, affects appetite, taste, and smell, eating well can be even harder.

Here are recommendations to have a balanced, healthy diet to help your recovery.

Hydrate: Fever, vomiting, and diarrhea can all contribute to dehydration, not to mention being hydrated is helpful for relieving cold symptoms as well.  Try to increase how much water you drink. Adults should try to drink eight 8-oz glasses of water every day when they aren’t sick. Adults who are recovering from an illness should drink 3 liters / 100oz / 12 8-oz glasses of mostly water every day. If you really want to help your body, add 1-2 servings of electrolyte drinks, like Pedialyte, Gatorade, or Emergen-C per day to stay hydrated. That can feel like a lot but sipping on small glasses of water every 15 minutes throughout the day can make it easier.

Food Frequency:  Small, frequent meals and snacks can help with meeting your increased needs, even when you’re not hungry. Try to eat small, healthy snacks or meals, or drink broth, supplement shakes, or smoothies every few hours.

Protein: Protein is essential for maintaining muscle mass and for building and repairing body tissues. So as your body is healing, you will need more protein. We recommend eating a variety of protein-rich foods like chicken, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, and seeds. Protein powders or drinks can be helpful if you need to increase your protein, especially if your appetite, taste, and/or smell are impacted because of your illness.

Nutrient-Dense Foods: These are foods that have a lot of vitamins and minerals – important for health. Examples of nutrition-dense foods includes fruits and vegetables, whole grains, fish, lean meat, skinless poultry, peas and beans, and healthy fats like avocado, nuts, and seeds. Nutrition helps when you’re recovering from being sick or injured, so try to eat as many of these foods as you can.

Vitamins and Minerals: Vitamins D, C and E, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids help your immune system heal from being sick or injured. Taking a daily multi-vitamin with these nutrients can be a good way to have enough but ask your doctor before taking any vitamins or supplements. The best way to get these important vitamins and minerals, though, is in what you eat. Eat as many nutrient-dense foods (listed above) as you can every day – at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables (frozen, fresh, canned, blended in smoothies, vegetable-based soups, etc.). Choose whole grains (brown rice, oatmeal, whole grain bread, whole wheat pasta, corn, or whole wheat tortillas) and include plenty of eggs, meat, dairy, healthy oils (olive, canola, avocado, flaxseed), nuts/seeds, and seafood.

Probiotics: Antibiotics are a powerful tool against bacterial infections, but they can disrupt your gut microbiome (the good bacteria and other microbes living in your intestines that help you digest your food), leaving you with side effects like diarrhea. If you need antibiotics, consider taking a supplement or eating plenty of probiotic foods during and after treatment. Since probiotics are also bacteria (what the antibiotic will be fighting), be sure to take your antibiotics and probiotics supplements or foods a few hours apart. Fermented foods are the best source of probiotics and include yogurt, kefir, cheese, sauerkraut, kombucha, kimchi, and probiotic drinks – Yakult or Bio Salud.

It is amazing what nutrition can do for our bodies and our daily lives. Nutrition helps our overall health by assisting our body in fighting diseases, recovering from illness and injury, and so much more. NOAH’s team of Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDN) works with our patients because nutrition is a big part of your overall health. Talk to one of our RDNs today to learn more.

Celebrate Soup Month with these Five Favorites

Winter weather calls for soup! There is nothing better on a cold night than a big bowl of homemade soup for dinner. That’s probably why January is National Soup Month!

When it comes to soup, there are so many options. It can be vegetarian or meat-based, it can be spicy or mellow, it can even be hot or cold. We have gathered our most popular soup recipes from the NOAH Registered Dietitian Nutritionist team to celebrate National Soup Month.

Here are our top five soup recipes – all full of healthy ingredients – to get you through the cold(ish) nights here in Arizona’s winter months.

NOAH Top Five Soup Recipes

  1. Roasted Butternut Squash, Apple and Sage Soup

This cozy soup recipe definitely gives fall feelings any time of year. This recipe is a great one to prep ahead of time – chopping squash and apples – and making plenty for leftovers. Full recipe here.

  • Vegetarian Lentil Tortilla Soup

Made in the slow cooker, this easy and flavorful soup is filled with healthy lentils and other veggies. It is packed with fiber and protein to keep you full. Full recipe here.

  • Tortellini Soup with Turkey and Kale

This creamy tortellini soup is easy to prepare – just a few ingredients – and ready in about 30 minutes. Full recipe here.

  • Tuscan White Bean Soup

Filled with vegetables and herbs, this soup will fill you up. We highly recommend enjoying this with some whole wheat bread on the side. Full recipe here.

  • Hearty Winter Minestrone Soup

The combination of pasta, vegetables, and flavorful broth, this minestrone soup is a favorite for every crowd. Full recipe here.

If you enjoy these easy and healthy recipes, be sure to check out our recipe page for more delicious recipes from our Nutrition Services team.  

Know More About Sugar

By Brandon Bolton, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

This week is Sugar Awareness Week. It is a time to spread awareness and prevalence of sugar and the damaging too much sugar can have our bodies. During Sugar Awareness Week, we should set a few goals to help reduce how much sugar we eat and drink – especially with added sugar. A great place to start is to understand sugar a little more. These healthy habits can carry forward for the rest of the year!

Natural sugars are found in foods such as fruit and milk. Added sugars are found in processed foods like soda, fruit juice, candy, cookies, cakes, breakfast cereals, condiments, and much more. A diet high in added sugars can cause weight gain and an increased risk of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, fatty liver disease, and much more.

The American Heart Association recommends most women consume no more than 24 grams of added sugars (6 teaspoons) daily, and men should consume no more than 36 grams of added sugar (9 teaspoons) daily. Children ages 2-18 should try to eat less than 24 grams of added sugar daily. For reference, the average person in the United States consumes around 71 grams of added sugar per day (17 teaspoons). Be sure to check your food label to get a better understanding of how much sugar is in your food.

Here are some tips on how to decrease your intake of added sugars:

  • Swap sodas, juices, sweetened teas, and energy drinks for water or unsweetened seltzers.
  • Drink your coffee black or use a zero-calorie sweetener such as Stevia.
  • Try plain yogurt and add fresh or frozen berries.
  • Consume whole fruits and vegetables instead of sugar-sweetened smoothies.
  • Replace candy with a homemade trail mix of fruit, nuts and a few dark chocolate chips.
  • Use olive oil and vinegar in place of sweet salad dressings like honey mustard.
  • Look for cereals, granolas, and granola bars with under 4 grams of sugar per serving.
  • Use natural nut butters instead of sweet spreads like Nutella.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages that are sweetened with soda, juice, honey, sugar, or agave.
  • Shop the perimeter of the grocery store, focusing on fresh, whole ingredients.
  • Try to prepare meals at home, it can be hard to tell how much sugar is in foods when eating out.
  • Consume a diet that is rich in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains.
  • Check nutrition labels to see how much sugar is in your product.

If you have any questions regarding sugar or any other nutrition related concerns, please reach out to one of NOAH’s Registered Dietitians!