Tips to Treat Nosebleeds in Children by Dr. Debbie Bauer, Pediatrician

“Nosebleeds are very common in children, especially during these winter months,” says Debbie Bauer, Pediatrician. The dry air from outside combined with the dry air from heaters inside can make the skin inside the nose more fragile and sensitive. This is one of the most common reasons children get nosebleeds. Some children also get nosebleeds from picking their nose, from sniffling too much from allergies/colds, or of course from being hit in the nose.

Learn what to do if your child has a nosebleed and when to get help from a doctor below. Also, check out our tips on how to prevent nosebleeds from coming back!

What should you do if your child has a nosebleed?

– First, don’t panic! Nosebleeds are rarely serious. Your child will have an easier time following your instructions if you remain calm.

– Have your child sit down and put their head slightly forward, NEVER have them tilt their head backwards.

– Put firm pressure on either side of their nose with your fingers and hold it there for 10 minutes.

– After 10 minutes, check to see if the bleeding stopped. If it hasn’t, hold firm pressure again for 10 more minutes.

– When bleeding has stopped, gently clean blood off their face with water but do not put anything in their nose or have them forcefully blow their nose.

When should you get help from a doctor?

– If your child has a nosebleed for more than 20 minutes without stopping.

– If your child looks very pale, weak or sweaty.

– If you see blood in your child’s urine or stool.

– If your child has strange, unexplained bruises.

– If frequent nosebleeds are concerning you.

How can you prevent nosebleeds?

– You can use a saline nasal spray to keep their nose from getting dry.

– You can use a humidifier in their room.

– You can apply a small amount of Vaseline inside their nose carefully with a Q-tip.

– If your child picks their nose, keep their fingernails trimmed short.

At NOAH, we’re here for you. If you have any questions for your child’s pediatrician, give us a call at 480-882-4545. You can also send a message to your pediatrician via your child’s MyChart account.

Skin Care Tips for Teens by Dr. Debbie Bauer, Pediatrician

“Adolescence can be a tough time – especially on your teen’s skin! Almost 8 out of 10 teenagers will have acne at some point,” says Dr. Debbie Bauer, Pediatrician. This is because the changing hormones cause an increase in oil production and can lead to clogged pores. This can happen all over your child’s body, not just their face. And while acne isn’t dangerous for their health, it can cause scars and decrease their self-esteem.

Here are a few pointers for home care of your teen’s skin:

  • Keep it clean: They should wash their face with warm water and a gentle cleanser twice per day. CeraVe, Cetaphil and Dove make reasonably-priced and effective cleansers.
  • Be gentle: Harsh scrubbing or rough washcloths are not recommended. Your teen should be using just their hands to gently rub in the cleanser and rinse off.  Very hot water or very cold water should not be used.
  • Stick to the routine: Oily skin and acne can last for months or years, so it’s important to have a good skin routine to minimize the effects. Remind your teen to always remove make-up before sleeping.  And change sheets and pillowcases frequently.
  • Don’t pop pimples: Although it’s tempting, squeezing pimples will only make things worse. Not only will they introduce more oil onto their skin from their hands, but this will probably push the oil deeper into the skin and cause inflammation and swelling.
  • Keep moisturizing: Drying out their face can actually lead to more acne because their body will try to produce even more oils to keep their face from being so dry. Make sure the moisturizer bottle says “oil free” or “noncomedogenic” on it so it doesn’t clog their pores more.
  • Use sun block: This is important for every child, but especially for those with acne. The sun’s rays can irritate skin and make acne and scars much, much worse. Make sure the sunscreen is at least SPF 15.

Some kids even need prescription medication to help manage acne, and our NOAH Pediatricians are here to help with that too!

For more information about taking care of your skin, visit the American Academy of Dermatology: www.aad.org.

National MA Week 2019

This week our NOAH Care Team celebrated all that our medical assistants do for our patients and their families. Check out these cool pics of our MA’s smiling with their team members and help us wish all #MedicalAssistants a happy #MARWeek! For an appt., call 480-882-4545.

Mental Health in Teenagers by Dr. Debbie Bauer, Pediatrician

Adolescence is a very difficult time for everybody, kids and parents alike. Teenagers are going through all kinds of changes such as: physical, emotional, intellectual and social. It can be hard to keep up with the way their feeling and finding ways to communicate with them. It’s a big challenge to try and not feel overwhelmed during these transitions. It’s very normal for a teen to feel moody, sad, or anxious, but when these feelings take over their life and start to affect how they think and act, it can become a serious problem. Mental health issues are much more common than you may think, about 1 out of every 5 adolescents has had a serious mental health disorder at some point in their life.

What parents need to know:

  • A mental health issue isn’t anybody’s fault. Just like with any other health complication, this is not a choice, it’s an actual problem with how the brain functions. The reason these issues develop is incredibly complicated and involves both genetic and environmental factors.
  • Mental health problems are common and treatable. There are many people and resources that are available to help your teenager. From pediatricians, to school guidance counselors, to mental health professionals – we’re all here to help. The sooner a concern is raised, the more time we have to address the issue, and get your teen the assistance they need. If you have any doubts, reach out!
  • It’s important to stay involved. Try to build a trusting relationship between yourself and your teenager. They should feel comfortable sharing information with you without fear of always being punished for bad choices. It can be helpful to share decisions that you have made or lessons you have learned from the past. Remember, they are still learning.

Signs of mental illness to look out for:

  • Loss of interest in past favorite activities
  • Sudden personality shifts that seem out of character
  • A sudden and/or dramatic change in grades
  • Isolation from friends and family
  • Big changes in sleep habits (more or less sleep then usual)
  • Dramatic changes in eating habits
  • Anything else that you think is concerning about their behavior

If you have any concerns about your teen’s mental health, talk to them. From there, you can schedule an appointment with their pediatrician. At NOAH, we address all aspects of your child’s health including their initial medical assessment. Other services that are available to you and your child include counseling and nutrition.

For more information, please visit:

www.healthychildren.org

Why Get Your Child a Flu Shot by Dr. Amit Jain, Pediatrician

It’s that time of year again! The fall and winter seasons are approaching. Along with exchanging presents during the holiday season, everyone, especially children, are passing around germs and illnesses between each other. We here at NOAH want to inform you about the flu and why it is important to protect your child against the flu with the flu vaccine.

The Flu is short for Influenza – a virus that most often causes an illness that affects our breathing and airways. There are many different viruses that can cause common cold symptoms, but influenza is different in that it is more contagious, and often causes worse symptoms, lasts longer (a week or more) and has more severe problems that it can cause compared to other common cold viruses including pneumonia (an infection of the lungs), and a bacterial infection.

The flu is highly contagious, and most often spread via droplets, meaning it is most often caught from being near when a person with flu coughs or sneezes. It can also be caught when a child touches something contaminated with the flu virus, then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

The symptoms of the flu include:

  • Sudden, often high fever
  • Chills
  • Body shakes
  • Muscle aches
  • Headache
  • Being more tired than usual
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Sore throat
  • Dry cough
  • Some children may even throw-up (vomit) and have diarrhea

Although the likelihood of getting the flu is high, the children who would suffer the greatest problems from getting the flu are:

  • Those with chronic medical conditions – especially respiratory conditions including Asthma and chronic lung disease
  • Heart problems
  • Diabetes
  • Sickle cell disease
  • Weakened immune system
  • Disorders of the brain or nervous system

How can you prevent or decrease the risk of your child getting this scary flu virus? The best way to protect against the flu is the influenza vaccine. All infants and children 6 months old and older can get the flu vaccine every year. Since babies younger than 6 months cannot get the influenza vaccine, the best way to protect them is that everyone around and taking care of the baby get the flu vaccine. Along with this, frequent, good hand washing with soap and water is especially important. If you cough or sneeze, be sure to do so into your elbow (like a vampire holding their cape!) or into a tissue, but not directly into your hands. Teach your children these good habits from a young age as well! Sanitize toys that your children play with frequently as well.

Along with this, it may be a good idea to keep your child home from daycare or school if they are having the following symptoms:

  • Fevers (usually a temperature greater than 101F)
  • Chills and shaking of the body
  • Headaches
  • Body aches
  • Tiredness / sleepiness
  • Sore throat
  • Runny nose / congestion
  • Dry cough

Do not hesitate to bring your child in to your NOAH clinic to evaluate your child and determine if any treatment would be helpful. 

The side effects from the flu vaccine are few, and generally much less severe than getting infected with the flu. These include:

  • A low-grade fever
  • Some redness and soreness around the site that the injection was given.
  • The flu vaccine is made using eggs. Those who have a severe allergy to egg (anaphylactic reaction) should have a discussion with their doctor before getting the flu vaccine.

At NOAH, we are here to help you and your child get through the cold and flu season safely and healthily. Please call today to make an appointment to get you and your child the flu vaccine!

For more information, please visit:

  1. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/health-issues/conditions/chest-lungs/Pages/The-Flu.aspx
  2. https://www.healthychildren.org/English/safety-prevention/immunizations/Pages/Prepare-Your-Family-for-Flu-Season.aspx
  3. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/index.htm
  4. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/prevent/vaccinations.htm

Asthma – 5 Most Common Triggers to Avoid

May is #AsthmaAwarenessMonth. Did you know 24 million Americans live with #asthma, including 6 million #children? Learn to control this #chronicdisease that affects your #lungs by taking the right medicine & avoiding triggers that may cause an #asthmaattack. Our Care Team at NOAH will work with you & your child to choose the best path for their overall #health & #wellness. To schedule an apt., please call 480-882-4545!

Happy Physician Assistants Week – 2018

We wish all #PhysicianAssistants a happy #PAweek! Our Care Team at NOAH are here to help you create and manage your #healthy #lifestyle #habits. Need help setting or sticking to your goals? Call 480-882-4545 today! #FamilyPractice #GetHealthy #MentalHealth


5 Tips for Treatment of Heat Exhaustion

The summer sun can be brutal on our bodies. If you find yourself out in the sun too long without proper hydration, are confused, dizzy, or are starting to feel sick, you may be experiencing heat exhaustion. Our Care Team at NOAH offer some helpful strategies you can follow if you are starting to feel the effects of heat exhaustion. Without proper intervention, heat exhaustion can progress to heat stroke, which can damage the brain, organs and possibly cause death. Read more

Stroke Awareness – Take care of your body

A stroke can happen to anyone, anywhere and at any age. Every four minutes someone dies from a stroke. Help NOAH raise awareness during #NationalStrokeAwarenessMonth by reading these tips and sharing them with your friends and family.

Lifestyle risk factors such as diet and exercise are controllable. People choose to engage in habits or behaviors that can directly increase their probability of having a stroke. Eating healthy includes making informed decisions about food choices and balancing your calories. Read more

One Stop Shop

Who has time to drive all over town for medical, dental and or specialty visits during the week? Do you even have the ability to take days off work for such outings? No, of course not! That’s what makes Community Health Centers special. We are One-Stop-Shops – get all services at one location, and we are right in your community. Learn about our integrative care model!


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