Tag Archive for: flu shot

Flu Vaccines Myth vs. Fact

By Leslie Shelton, DO | Heuser Family Medicine Resident, PGY-I

There has been a lot of talk about vaccines lately. It can be confusing! So, let’s talk about some information about the flu vaccine and if it’s fact or myth.

“The flu vaccine gives you the flu.”MYTH

The flu vaccine is a dead form of the virus – it can not make more of itself inside the body. The possible side effects of most vaccines include fever, muscle aches and fatigue and that can be confusing because they are also symptoms of the flu. But it does not mean you have the flu, it just means you received a vaccine and your body is preparing for the possible future.

“The flu vaccine changes every year.”TRUTH

As the flu virus makes its way across the world, it is constantly changing and evolving. Based on years and years of data, the flu vaccine is altered every year to protect against the most likely strains of flu in the coming year.

“I got the flu vaccine and I still got the flu, so it does not work.”MYTH

A vaccine is not a magic bullet against getting an infection in the future (but that would be nice)! Instead, it helps make sure that IF you do get sick, your body is much better prepared to fight it so you do not get as ill as you may have without the vaccine.

“Kids should get the flu shot.”TRUTH

Any person 6 months of age or older should get the yearly flu vaccine. For those who are around infants younger than 6 months, it is even MORE important to be vaccinated to help protect them.

“I am allergic to eggs, so I cannot get the flu vaccine.”MYTH

This used to be true, but not any longer! The making of the flu vaccine has changed to be egg-free so that it is now safe to give to people with egg allergies.

Want More Info?

Test your knowledge with 5 Myths About the Flu Vaccine from the World Health Organization (WHO) and get Key Facts About the Seasonal Flu from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

If you have any questions about the flu vaccine, the doctors and pharmacists in your community would be more than happy to answer them. NOAH has also compiled 5 Things to Know for Flu Season specific to the 2021/2022 season. We are all in this together, so let’s prevent the flu!

Here’s What to Know About the Flu Shot

By Andrea Klock MSN, FNP-C | Family Nurse Practitioner

It’s that time of year again: Flu Season. Most people are familiar with the influenza (flu) vaccination and thankfully many of us receive a shot every year. With the current focus on COVID and that vaccine, it’s still very important to protect ourselves and each other from the flu.

Because the flu vaccine has been common for years, a lot of people don’t know the facts about the vaccine, like and why a yearly shot is necessary as compared to receiving a series or booster like the COVID vaccine.

Common Flu Vaccine Questions Answered

Why is the flu vaccine so important?

The CDC estimates that on average 3 – 11% of the population in the United States contract influenza yearly. But this number only reflects symptomatic patients who got tested for influenza. The percentage is higher when including persons who did not have symptoms or didn’t see a provider for a test.

Who is at high risk for problems if they catch the flu?

Those who are considered high risk for more serious complications if they get the flu include people who are 65 years or older, have a cancer diagnosis, are pregnant, have chronic medical conditions, or are young children.

When is the flu season?

Although the influenza virus can be detected at any time during the year, the peak infection time starts in the fall and goes through the winter months.

Why do I need the flu vaccine every year?

The influenza virus changes – mutates – every year creating new strains every flu season. The vaccine is restructured every year to provide the best possible coverage from new strains.

Can receiving the flu vaccination cause you to get the flu?

No – the flu vaccine is made with an inactivated virus or single protein (very small part) from the virus. Any reactions that mimic the flu after receiving the vaccination are our own body’s immune response.

How do I prevent catching the flu?

Along with getting the flu shot, the best way to prevent getting sick is to avoid others that are sick. A lot of what we did to slow COVID helps slow the flu too, like cover coughs and sneezes, wash your hands, and disinfect surfaces that may have been contaminated with the influenza virus. Always stay home from work, school, and other activities when sick to keep it from spreading to others.

Did you get your flu shot yet? Make an appointment with your NOAH provider today and get protected from the flu this season.

5 Things to Know for Flu Season 2021-2022

Flu season is around the corner and NOAH is ready to keep you and your family protected. We know that with COVID there might be additional questions about the virus, symptoms, and the vaccines. NOAH has you covered with these top five things to know about flu season.

1. Flu Season Is Almost Here

Flu season officially starts in October and can last through May of the following year. But the peak of flu usually happens around December through March with February being the month that often has the most flu cases nationwide.

2. Try These Safety Measures Stop the Flu

Many of the things we are doing now to slow or stop the spread of COVID like extra hand washing, more antibacterial gels and wipes, staying home when sick, wearing masks (especially if sneezing or coughing), will help reduce the flu as well! During last year’s flu season, the flu was minimal because of these safety measures, along with a lot of social distancing, so it is possible to keep the spread of flu lower than previous years.

3. The Flu Vaccine Helps

Every year, flu shot manufacturers identify the strains of influenza A and B that pose the most risk for the coming season. Flu shots also include H1N1, and because of flu shots, H1N1 isn’t causing outbreaks anymore. Flu shots are adjusted every year with new influenza (flu) strains because it mutates like all viruses.  

4. Flu Shots Help Different Ages Appropriately

Children are a high-risk group with flu so anyone 6 months and older should get the flu shot. When children under eight are getting the flu vaccine for the first time ever, they will need to have two doses, given four weeks apart. The following flu seasons will be just one dose.

A high-dose flu vaccine made specifically to support the more fragile immune system of people 65+ is available during flu season.

5. Flu Shots and COVID Shots Can Go Together

The CDC says that it is safe to get the flu and COVID vaccines at the same time.  If you have any concerns about potential side effects or changes in effectiveness of the vaccines if given together we suggest talking to your NOAH provider to come up with a vaccine plan that is right for you.

Almost everyone can and should get the flu shot every year, including people with egg allergies.. The only people who shouldn’t are patients under 6 months old or someone with history of an anaphylactic reaction to the flu shot in the past or a flu shot component. 

The CDC has a lot of information about flu season including updated flu cases and vaccine activity on their website here. NOAH offers patients different options including regular appointments and drive-up flu shots. If you have questions about the flu vaccine or want to schedule your appointment, contact NOAH today!